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  • January 5, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Little to eat for IDPs in makeshift Kabul camp
    IRIN: Azizullah's family left their home in the Sangin District of Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, because of the worsening conflict, drought and food security situation. Their new home is a one-room mud-hut in the western outskirts of Kabul where over 4,500 internally displaced persons (IDPs) have established a makeshift camp. "We abandoned our home because of aerial strikes [by international forces] and brutalities by the Taliban," Azizullah told IRIN as his six bare-foot children huddled around him on a cold afternoon on 28 December.      Full news...

  • January 4, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    A 12-year old Boy Raped in Afghanistan
    PAN (Translated by RAWA): A 12-year old boy in Faryab province was raped. General Mohammad Sadiq, commander of the Commanding Security of Faryab, told PAN that the boy was named Farhad and had been kidnapped a day back. Two men in a Corolla car had kidnapped him from the city of Maimana to the Shireen Tugab District and raped him there. He added that after that the rapists had intoxicated him and freed him from a Corolla car in the Friday Bazaar in Maimanah (capital city of Faryab) and escaped from there.      Full news...

  • January 3, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    “Talibanization” grows near capital
    Associated Press: Two months ago, Mohammad Anwar recalls, the Taliban paraded accused thieves through his village, tarred their faces with oil and threw them in jail. The public punishment was a clear sign to villagers that the Taliban are now in charge. And the province they took over lies just 30 miles from the Afghan capital of Kabul, right on the main highway. The Taliban has long operated its own shadow government in the most dangerous parts of Afghanistan, but its power is now spreading north to the doorstep of Kabul, according to Associated Press interviews with a dozen government officials, analysts, Taliban commanders and Afghan villagers.      Full news...

  • January 2, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Bribes Corrode Afghans’ Trust in Government
    Star-News Online: Nowhere is the scent of corruption so strong as in the Kabul neighborhood of Sherpur. Before 2001, it was a vacant patch of hillside that overlooked the stately neighborhood of Wazir Akbar Khan. Today it is the wealthiest enclave in the country, with gaudy, grandiose mansions that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Afghans refer to them as “poppy houses.” Sherpur itself is often jokingly referred to as “Char-pur,” which literally means “City of Loot.” Yet what is perhaps most remarkable about Sherpur is that many of the homeowners are government officials, whose annual salaries would not otherwise enable them to live here for more than a few days.      Full news...

  • January 2, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghanistan an ill-conceived blunder
    Midland Free Press: What will it take to convince the Harper government that Canada's military invasion of Afghanistan was an ill-conceived, monumental blunder and failure? As of Dec. 28, 2008 the lives of 106 Canadian soldiers in the flourishing stage of their youthful development have been killed in a war started by George W. Bush and his hawkish Republican Administration. The loss of one Canadian in Bush's war, or what could become Obama's war, is one too many. Further in this regard, Barack Obama's ostentatious saber rattling during his election campaign and his more recent pronouncements on the subject, is not an auspicious or favourable beginning for a newly-elected president of the USA.      Full news...

  • January 1, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    A Day Afghans Will Always Remember
    Quqnoos: Coordination Council 15th anniversary Fifteen years from today on Jadi 11, 1372 (December 31, 1993) the Afghan civil war began in Kabul. This day is remembered as one of the worst days in the recent history of Afghanistan, as some analyst recall, “Rockets and heavy missiles were being fired from every direction in Kabul". It was the starting date to change Kabul city from a typical capital to ruins,Countless dead bodies were on the streets of Kabul in the following days. Kabul hospitals became full of wounded people and there weren’t enough medicine for them, and people were dying on daily bases.      Full news...

  • December 30, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Two Gang-Rape Victims in Afghanistan Cry for Justice
    Tolo TV (Translated by RAWA): Rape victims demand severe punishments for the people involved in the crime. Two girls, thirteen and twelve years old, were gang-raped by powerful men and regional commanders in Sar-e-Pul about four months back. They say that till now no measures have been taken against the people who had raped them. They demanded justice from the government and legal and judicial bodies. Increasing cases of rape, especially those of children, have greatly worried people in the country. Human rights organizations have also expressed concern over the terrible aftermath of the rapes.      Full news...

  • December 30, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Corruption destroying Afghanistan’s ‘democracy’
    Galesburg.com: Chayes, who organized a co-op of Afghan men and women making skin care products from herbs and botanicals as an alternative to the opium poppy trade, wrote, “I hear from Westerners that corruption is intrinsic to Afghan culture, that we should not hold Afghans up to our standards. I hear that Afghanistan is a tribal place, that it has never been, and can’t be, governed. But that’s not what I hear from Afghans.” What they see instead, she said, is a restoration to power under President Hamid Karzai of the gunslinging, crooked warlords who were repudiated when the Taliban first started taking over vast parts of the country a few years after the Soviet withdrawal in 1989. The “appalling behavior” of officials in the current government, including rampant bribery, extortion and violence, is a serious factor in the Taliban resurgence.      Full news...

  • December 29, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Fourteen children among 22 killed in Afghan attacks
    AFP: Fourteen children were among 20 Afghans killed in new extremist attacks in insurgency-hit Afghanistan that also left two Canadian soldiers dead, security officials said Sunday. The children and two adults died in a powerful suicide car bombing in the eastern province of Khost, said the NATO-led force, which has troops across the country to fight the insurgents. "In the process he killed 16 Afghans and wounded 58 others," NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) said in a statement.      Full news...

  • December 25, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    UNFPA: About 25% Women in Afghanistan Face Sexual Violence
    PAN (Translated by RAWA): Recent statistics show that about 25% of women in the country are subjected to sexual violence. Younis Payan, deputy of the United Nations Population Fund in Afghanistan (UNFPA), who was giving a speech on the first day of a one-day workshop (A Happy Family and Intact Society from Islam’s Viewpoint), said the survey had been conducted recently. According to Younis Payan, the statistics show that about 30.7% women suffer physical violence and another 30% suffer from psychological violence.      Full news...

  • December 24, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    AIHRC: Poverty in the rise in Afghanistan
    Quqnoos: Afghanistan’s Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) has expressed concerns over the increasing poverty in the country. According to the latest report by the commission, about ten million people in Afghanistan which make 37% of the population, suffer from severe poverty. Also a large number of people in Afghanistan earn less than Afg.50 in a day.      Full news...

  • December 22, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghan Parents Selling Their Sons to Survive
    The Telegraph: The trade in children is spurred by the battered country's economy and the failure of foreign aid to reach beyond the coffers of central government in the capital Kabul. A cameraman working for Channel 4 News, Mehran Bozorgnia, witnessed the sale of an eight-year-old boy, Qassem, to Sadiqa, a wealthy woman from Kabul, outside the northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif.      Full news...

  • December 19, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Kidnapping and Raping of a 15-Year Old Afghan Girl in Farah
    PAN (Translated by RAWA): The police in Farah province arrested five men-including a policeman -for kidnapping and raping a 15-year old girl and rescued the girl from them. According to him, the soldier of the Provincial Security Commander had kidnapped a 15-year old girl from the Farah city and took her to the home of one of his relatives, and there together with some other men raped her.      Full news...

  • December 18, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghan residents fear kidnapping gangs more than Taliban
    Miami Herald: Kabul's growing crime problem is more than a security issue -- it's a sign of a failing government. If government security forces -- whom many charge with complicity in the crime wave -- can't protect the populace from thugs, how can they protect remote parts of the country from an increasingly armed, financed and organized Taliban, residents say. More U.S. troops around the capital may not be the answer.      Full news...

  • December 17, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Coalition forces kill three of an Afghan family in Khost
    PAN: Three of a family, including a couple and their son were killed by the firing of Coalition forces in Kandao area near NATO base in Khost City of the eastern Khost province. Tahir Khan Sabri, deputy governor of the province told Pajhwok Afghan News that coalition forces in an operation at the house of the brother of Dr. Bilal has killed his brother, sister-in-law and nephew.      Full news...

  • December 16, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    The failure to end corruption threatens Afghanistan’s future
    The Washington Post: Nurallah strode into our workshop in Khandahar shaking with rage. His mood shattered ours. "This is no government," he stormed. "The police are like animals." In the seven years I've lived in this stronghold of the Afghan south - the erstwhile capital of the Taliban and the focus of their renewed assault on the country - most of my conversations with locals about what's going wrong have centered on corruption and abuse of power. "More than roads, more than schools or wells or electricity, we need good governance," said Nurallah during yet another discussion a couple of weeks ago.      Full news...

  • December 16, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    From the CIA to the ISI to the Lashkar-e-Taiba: Mumbai Terror’s Afghan Roots
    CounterPunch.org: After early speculation that the recent Mumbai attacks were linked to Pakistan, a former U.S. Defense Department official now asserts that Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) had a hand in training the Lashkar-e-Taiba terrorists. Earlier this year Afghan president Hamid Karzai blamed Pakistan for a brazen assassination attempt from which he barely escaped, and U.S. officials contend that the July 7, 2008 bombing of India’s Kabul Embassy, which claimed 41 lives, had also been aided by the ISI.      Full news...

  • December 16, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghanistan on brink of famine, aid agency warns
    National Post: Foreign aid organizations say food shortages and early snows may leave eight million Afghans -- 30% of the population -- on the brink of starvation this winter. Famine could easily overtake violence as the country's top problem. "The current situation is extremely fragile," said Susannah Nicol, a spokeswoman for the World Food Program(WFP) in Kabul.      Full news...

  • December 16, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Meet the Taliban Commander Who Likes Girls And Shopping
    The First Post: Qadir, a short plump man constantly on the phone making social arrangements, did not join the Taliban for ideological reasons. He was in Kabul on an infrequent shopping trip, ahead of the Muslim festival of Eid. With deep black hair, beard and eyes, Qadir is Pashtun - the ethnic group from which the Taliban draws most of its support - and he sprawled low in the back of the taxi until we were able to stop and find a private room with draped windows where he propped himself up on a pile of cushions and smoked ferociously while we talked. "To begin with I thought the international forces would bring peace and stability," Qadir said. "Then they started treating Afghans as their enemies. Their Apache helicopters killed civilians working in the fields."      Full news...

  • December 15, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghan reporters keep shoes on for Bush, ordered to call him “His Excellency”
    The Associated Press: A day after an Iraqi reporter hurled a pair of shoes at President George W. Bush, the American leader on Monday again held a news conference before a group of reporters from a country that the U.S. invaded under his watch. Karzai's deputy spokesman, Saimak Herwai, told Afghan reporters that they had to address Bush as "His Excellency," an honorary title not typically used with U.S. presidents.      Full news...

  • December 14, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghans torn over family size
    San Francisco Chronicle: Today, many Afghan couples are torn between adhering to the tradition of large families and the financial reality of caring for many children. Afghanistan has the highest fertility rate in Asia at more than seven children per woman. About 800,000 people annually are added to the nation's population of 32 million, according to the United Nations Development Fund. The dilemma is particularly significant in rural areas where parents depend on children to tend crops and livestock, but where war and drought have pushed many Afghans into poverty.      Full news...

  • December 14, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Iraqi journalist throws shoes at Bush during press conference in Baghdad
    CNN: A man identified as an Iraqi journalist threw shoes at -- but missed -- President Bush during a news conference Sunday evening in Baghdad, where Bush was making a farewell visit. Bush ducked, and the shoes, flung one at a time, sailed past his head during the news conference with Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki in his palace in the heavily fortified Green Zone.      Full news...

  • December 12, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Four Civilains Killed in Shooting by U.S. at a Bus Carrying Afghans
    AP: United States soldiers opened fire on a bus carrying civilians Friday in central Afghanistan, killing four passengers after the driver refused to stop, military officials said. At least 10 passengers were wounded, said Halim Fidai, the governor of Wardak Province. The military said the wounded had been evacuated to military hospitals. The shooting occurred about 40 miles south of Kabul, the capital, on the main road between Kabul and the southern city of Kandahar.      Full news...

  • December 12, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Kandahar Schools Empty After Acid Attack on Girls
    IWPR: The Mirwais Meena girls’school used to be a bustling place with over 1300 students. But now the halls and grounds are nearly empty, the swings hang motionless on the recreation field. On a late November morning, there were only a dozen or so girls and three female teachers to be seen. The rest, traumatised by a vicious attack on November 12 that left several girls disfigured and two blinded, have chosen to stay at home.      Full news...

  • December 12, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    As possible Afghan war-crimes evidence removed, US silent
    McClatchy Newspapers: Seven years ago, a convoy of container trucks rumbled across northern Afghanistan loaded with a human cargo of suspected Taliban and al Qaida members who'd surrendered to Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostum, an Afghan warlord and a key U.S. ally in ousting the Taliban regime. When the trucks arrived at a prison in the town of Sheberghan, near Dostum's headquarters, they were filled with corpses. Most of the prisoners had suffocated, and others had been killed by bullets that Dostum's militiamen had fired into the metal containers. Dostum's men hauled the bodies into the nearby desert and buried them in mass graves, according to Afghan human rights officials. By some estimates, 2,000 men were buried there.      Full news...


  • December 10, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    The CIA and Drugs
    Capitol Hill Blue: On August 18, 1996, the San Jose Mercury initiated an extended series of articles about the CIA connection to the crack epidemic in Los Angeles. Though the CIA and influential media like The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Los Angeles Times went out of their way to belittle the significance of the articles, the basic ingredients of the story were not really new -- the CIA's Contra army, fighting the leftist government of Nicaragua, turning to smuggling cocaine into the U.S., under CIA protection, to raise money for their military and personal use.      Full news...

  • December 10, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    U.S. troops kill six Afghan policemen, civilian
    RIA Novosti: U.S. forces killed six Afghan police officers on Wednesday in a friendly-fire incident in the city of Qalat in southern Afghanistan, a local deputy police chief said. The U.S. military said in a statement that a civilian was also killed in the firefight, and 13 people were injured. The police station building was severely damaged.      Full news...

  • December 9, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Warlords Toughen US Task in Afghanistan
    Time: Like many mothers in Afghanistan, Maghferat Samimi has affixed the photo of a child to her mobile phone. But the two-and-a-half-year-old is not her daughter.... Last year Samimi received a phone call from General Abdul Rashid Dostum, a U.S. ally who was appointed by Afghan President Hamid Karzai as Army Chief of Staff, threatening to have her raped "by 100 men" if she continued investigating a rape case in which he was implicated. Dostum denies ever making such a threat and calls the rape allegation "propaganda." A witness to the phone call, military prosecutor General Habibullah Qasemi, was dismissed from his post soon after, despite carrying a sheaf of glowing recommendation letters penned by U.S. military supervisors.      Full news...

  • December 8, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Taliban in 72 pct of Afghanistan, think-tank says
    Reuters: The Taliban hold a permanent presence in 72 percent of Afghanistan, a think-tank said on Monday, but NATO and the Afghan government rejected the report, saying its figures were not credible. The findings by the International Council on Security and Development (ICOS) come in the wake of a series of critical reports on Western-led military and development efforts to put an end to the seven-year Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan.      Full news...



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