News from the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA)
RAWA News


 

 

 

Add RAWA RSS Feed to Feedreaders



 




 


RAWA Photo Gallery
From RAWA Photo Gallery
 


Help RAWA: Order from our wish list on Amazon.com

RAWA Channel on Youtube

Follow RAWA on Twitter

Join RAWA on Facebook

  • June 9, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Iranian weapons getting through to Taliban
    The Telegraph: Heavy weapons are continuing to stream across the Afghan border from Iran despite Barack Obama's attempts to enlist Tehran's help in fighting the insurgency, officials have said. Border police say they are regularly intercepting consignments of anti-tank mines and mortars bound for Afghan militants fighting Nato-led forces.      Full news...

  • June 7, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Sexual violence against children common in Afghanistan: report
    The Canadian Press: The trafficking and sexual exploitation of children in Afghanistan is a growing concern, Canada's Foreign Affairs Department was told in a confidential human-rights report prepared by senior officials. The illegal marriage of underage girls and the sexual abuse of young boys is commonplace, warned the Afghanistan Human Rights Report obtained by The Canadian Press under access-to-information laws. "Sexual violence is commonly reported but remains difficult to verify," said the partially censored review, written last summer.      Full news...

  • June 7, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    UNICEF: 24 Percent of Afghan Children Aged 7-14 are in Employment
    IRIN: Poverty, community pressure and the low quality of education mean 25 percent of children in Afghanistan aged 7-14 are at risk of leaving school and drifting into exploitative work situations, according to a new report by a Kabul-based think-tank. The cost of education, lack of role models and family pressures were cited as reasons why children often ended up being exploited in backstreet workshops, factories or as domestic servants.      Full news...

  • June 6, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    The U.S. and the Afghan Tragedy
    The Huffington Post: Many Americans are profoundly ignorant of history, even regarding distant countries where the United States finds itself at war. One need not know much about Afghanistan's rich and ancient history, however, to learn some important lessons regarding the tragic failures of U.S. policy toward that country during the past three decades.... The Reagan administration sensed the most hard-line elements of the resistance were less likely to reach negotiated settlements, but the goal was to cripple the Soviet Union, not free the Afghan people. Recognizing the historically strong role of Islam in Afghan society, they tried to exploit it to advance U.S. policy goals.      Full news...

  • June 5, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Soul-Searching Following Farah Tragedy
    IWPR: America pledges to reduce price paid by civilians in war against Taliban, but disputes Afghan estimates for Farah airstrike death toll. Sayed Karim, 72, is now all alone. The elderly, white bearded man bowed his turbaned head as he told of the 13 members of his family who were killed in a May 4 airstrike by United States forces in Farah province, on Afghanistan’s western border. “I am no longer young,” he sighed. “I cannot build a new life.”      Full news...

  • June 5, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    AFGHANISTAN: Radio station director’s murder still unpunished two years later
    Reporters Without Borders: Radio journalist Zakia Zaki’s murder two years ago tomorrow is still unpunished and her husband assures Reporters Without Borders that the lack of progress with the investigation is almost certainly due to the influence of the murder’s masterminds. The director of Sada-e-Solh (Peace Radio), Zaki was gunned down in her home in Jabalussaraj, in the northern province of Parwan, on 6 June 2007.      Full news...

  • June 4, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Sharp rise in attempted illegal migration of Afghans to Europe
    IRIN News: Facing unemployment, insecurity and lack of socio-economic opportunities at home, many Afghans, mostly young males, have increasingly resorted to costly and perilous illegal migration to European and other industrialized countries. Over 18,000 Afghan asylum-seekers were registered in 44 industrialized states in 2008 - a significant increase on previous years, according to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR).      Full news...

  • June 4, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Faulted firm gets Afghan aid work from USAID
    USA TODAY: Despite Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton's call to reduce the reliance on foreign aid contractors, the main U.S. aid agency is continuing to award multimillion-dollar contracts as it proposed to increase development spending in Afghanistan to $2.8 billion. An inspector general's audit released May 11 criticized DAI's performance on a $164 million contract to promote local governance. Success, the audit found, was "highly questionable" in part because DAI "had no overall strategy" for implementing local projects.      Full news...

  • June 3, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Bagram: Is it Obama’s new Guantanamo?
    MSNBC: Should detainees the United States has shipped to the Bagram air base in Afghanistan have the same constitutional right to challenge their detention in court that prisoners at the Guantanamo prison in Cuba have been given? President Barack Obama didn't answer that question in a May 21 speech outlining his policy for dealing with alleged terrorists. In fact, Obama didn't mention Bagram at all.      Full news...

  • June 1, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Haqqani network, the most deadly US foe in Afghanistan
    Christian Science Monitor: The Haqqani network is considered the most sophisticated of Afghanistan's insurgent groups. The group is alleged to be behind many high-profile assaults, including a raid on a luxury hotel in Kabul in January 2008 and a massive car bombing of the Indian Embassy in Kabul that left 41 people dead in July 2008.... Haqqani's son Sirajuddin has now taken the reins of the organization, according to intelligence officials. The younger Haqqani has proved more dynamic than his father, expanding the network greatly in the last few years.      Full news...

  • May 30, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Amnesty International 2009 Human Rights Report on Afghanistan
    Amnesty International: Millions of people living in southern and eastern Afghanistan, terrorized by the Taliban, other insurgent groups and local militias ostensibly allied with the government, suffered insecurity that further restricted their already limited access to food, health care, and schooling. Indiscriminate attacks, abductions and the targeting of civilians reached unprecedented levels. The Taliban and other anti-government groups significantly expanded their attacks to cover more than a third of the country, including areas once considered relatively safe in the centre and the north.      Full news...

  • May 28, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    US soldier: “The US govt. has deceived not only the American public, but also the international community”
    CommonDreams.org: André Shepherd, who was stationed in Germany, refuses to deploy to Iraq. Many U.S. soldiers stationed in Europe who refused service in or support of the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan have been tried in U.S. military courts in Europe and imprisoned in the U.S. military's correctional facility at Mannheim; the most well known are Blake Lemoine (2005) and Agustín Aguayo (2006-2007). But Shepherd is so far the first to turn to the German government for help: last November he filed a formal application to the German government for asylum.      Full news...

  • May 28, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Aid expert says only pennies of foreign money reaching Afghans
    The Canadian Press: An international aid expert says only pennies from each dollar being sent to Afghanistan are actually reaching the people who need help. Marco Vicenzino says he is appalled by the inefficiency of humanitarian aid efforts. Vicenzino, who is a strategic adviser for the Afghanistan World Foundation, says about 80 cents of every dollar goes back to donor countries - largely through the contractors doing the work.      Full news...

  • May 28, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    MoD admits use of controversial ‘enhanced blast’ weapons in Afghanistan
    The Guardian: British pilots in Afghanistan are firing an increasing number of "enhanced blast" thermobaric weapons, designed to kill everyone in buildings they strike, the Ministry of Defence has revealed. Since the start of this year more than 20 of the US-designed missiles, which have what is officially described as a "blast fragmentation warhead", have been fired by pilots of British Apache attack helicopters. A total of 20 were also fired last year after they were bought by the MoD from the Americans last May.      Full news...

  • May 27, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghan was taken to Guantanamo aged 12-rights group
    Reuters: An Afghan who has spent over six years at the U.S. military's Guantanamo Bay prison was only around 12 years old when he was detained, not 16 or 17 as his official record says, an Afghan rights group said on Tuesday. Interviews with the family of Mohammed Jawad, who like many poor Afghans does not know his exact age or birthday, showed he was probably not even a teenager when he was arrested in 2002, the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission said.      Full news...

  • May 26, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    US Soldier: “There’s No Way I’m Going to Deploy to Afghanistan”
    IPS: "It’s a matter of what I’m willing to live with," Specialist Victor Agosto of the U.S. Army, who is refusing orders to deploy to Afghanistan, explained to IPS. "I’m not willing to participate in this occupation, knowing it is completely wrong.".... On one of them, dated May 1, Agosto’s written statement appears: "There is no way I will deploy to Afghanistan. The occupation is immoral and unjust. It does not make the American people any safer. It has the opposite effect."      Full news...

  • May 26, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghans Say Iranian-Made Weapons Seized In Helmand
    RFE/RL: Afghan officials say Iranian-made weapons have been found in Afghanistan's southern Helmand Province, Radio Free Afghanistan reports. The commander of state military units in Kandahar, General Sher Muhammad Zazi, and Helmand Governor Gulab Mangal told journalists in Kabul that a significant amount of drugs was seized from militants in Marja along with the weapons in a May 26 operation.      Full news...

  • May 25, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghanistan foe: population surge
    The Trentonian: If so, maybe it’s time to look at the other Afghan surge: its population growth. It’s been seven years now since George W. Bush committed American troops to Afghanistan. Since then, Afghanistan’s population has jumped by 22 percent. Under current projections, its population will be twice as large in 2026 as it was in 2001. That’s because the average Afghan woman has almost seven children, one of the highest fertility rates in the world.      Full news...

  • May 24, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghan government plans Internet curbs
    AFP: The Afghan government is planning curbs on Internet use, starting with blocking pornography sites, as the country's first fiber optic cable is due to be on-line in weeks, officials said Sunday. The communications and information ministries are studying limits on web access because the current "free Internet environment" is being misused in particular by the youth, communications ministry spokesman Abdul Hadi told AFP.      Full news...

  • May 22, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghan women are killed for demanding their rights
    MADRE: Women in Afghanistan are routinely denied basic human rights, including education, healthcare, freedom from violence, and freedom of movement. Afghan women who fight to change this reality are attacked and even assassinated by ultra-conservatives. Meanwhile, US airstrikes that kill civilians further endanger Afghan women and their families. They also increase the power of the Taliban and other reactionary forces as more Afghans turn to them for protection from the United States.      Full news...

  • May 22, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Public millions fail to provide wells, schools and clinics in Afghanistan
    The Times: Millions of pounds in taxpayers’ money have been wasted on failed reconstruction projects in Afghanistan, according to an internal assessment by the Department for International Development. An evaluation by independent consultants criticised the department’s approach to planning, risk management and staffing, and said poor co-ordination with the rest of Whitehall meant that the department was slow to shift strategy as the military effort moved to counter-insurgency.      Full news...

  • May 21, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Teenage mother stabbed to death in Faryab, Northern Afghanistan
    PAN: A teenage mother was stabbed to death by her in-laws in northwestern Faryab province on Wednesday what appears to be a result of domestic violence, officials said Thursday. Raheela, 18, who died from multiple stab wounds was the mother of one who got married four years ago, women affairs director in Faryab, Sharifa Azimi told PAN. Raheela's family members charged her father-in-law for killing her.      Full news...

  • May 20, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Closures after Taliban Threats: German Army Can’t Protect Afghan Girls’ Schools
    Six schools in the northern region of Kunduz closed following Taliban threats in recent weeks. The German army says it can't protect them. The schools received letters threatening acid and gas attacks, and teachers and pupils responded by staying home. The Afghan authorities finally decided to shut the schools altogether. The affected district of Chahar Darreh in the province of Kunduz is largely under the Taliban's control.      Full news...

  • May 20, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    NATO: Airstrike Kills 8 Afghan Civilians
    VOA News: NATO says an airstrike by one of its warplanes has killed eight civilians in southern Afghanistan, in the midst of a controversy over civilian casualties. The NATO-led international military force on Wednesday said its troops called in the airstrike Tuesday in Helmand province after a clash with about 25 insurgents. A NATO statement accused the militants of using the civilians as human shields.      Full news...

  • May 19, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Foreign Troops Kill Afghan Farmer in Farah, People Protest
    Quqnoos: Foreign troops gunned down a local farmer Monday in Pushtrod District of the western Farah province, an official said. The US convoy opened fire on the farmer when he war irrigating his farms early Monday morning in the district, north of the provincial capital city. Bilqees Roshan, a provincial council member said the body of the farmers is flamed.      Full news...

  • May 15, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    The warlords casting a shadow over Afghanistan
    The Independent: One of the most feared of the Afghan warlords, Faryadi Zardad, was notorious for robbing, raping, torturing and killing travellers on the road between Kabul and Jalalabad. He kept a savage assistant in a cave who would bite and rip the flesh of his victims; other captives were murdered or imprisoned until they died of their sufferings or bribes were paid for their release. Uniquely among the warlords of Afghanistan, many guilty of actions similar to his own, Zardad is in prison for his crimes.      Full news...

  • May 13, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Problems with Afghan Prisons Reported before Prostitution Scandal
    YLE.fi: suspicions of sexual exploitation of female inmates at the Maimana prison in Afghanistan were investigated already in the winter of 2007. The prison was built with the help of Finnish development cooperation funding. Last week it was reported that prostitution was taking place in another penal facility built with Finnish help – the Sheberghan women’s prison.      Full news...

  • May 13, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Why We Fight: U.S. troops die for rapists
    Boise Weekly: American soldiers serving in Vietnam wondered what they were fighting for. U.S. troops in Afghanistan don't have that problem. They know exactly what they're fighting for: rapists. America's media repeatedly claimed that Afghan women would be better off under the U.S.-supported Northern Alliance puppet government headed by Karzai than under the Taliban. But when I went to Afghanistan and asked women what they thought, they had a different story. The defeat of the Taliban brought about the collapse of law and order, making life even more dangerous, especially for women.      Full news...

  • May 13, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Drug trade permeates Afghanistan
    McClatchy Newspapers: Afghanistan produces more than 90 percent of the world's opium, which was worth some $3.4 billion to Afghan exporters last year. For a cut of that, Afghan officials open their highways to opium and heroin trafficking, allow public land to be used for growing opium poppies and protect drug dealers. The drug trade funnels hundreds of millions of dollars each year to drug barons and the resurgent Taliban, the militant Islamist group that's killed an estimated 450 American troops in Afghanistan since 2001 and seeks to overthrow the fledgling democracy here.      Full news...

  • May 12, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    97 girl students, teachers poisoned in Afghanistan
    Xinhua: Nearly 100 girl students and teachers of a school in Kapisa province, 80 km north of the Afghan capital Kabul, mysteriously fell unconscious on Tuesday, spokesman of Public Health Ministry Ahmad Farid Rahed said. "A possible poisonous gas attack in Qazak Girl School this morning in Kohistan district has sickened 90 students and seven teachers," Rahed told Xinhua.      Full news...



< Previous 1 2 3 ... 84 85 86 ... 118 119 120 Next >