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  • February 15, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Iran is helping Taliban in Afghanistan, says Petraus
    Bloomberg: Iran is helping Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan, said General David Petraeus, who is in charge of US forces in the Central Asian nation and Iraq. “There is a willingness to provide some degree of assistance to make the life of those who are trying to help the Afghan people difficult,” Petraeus told a conference today in the Qatari capital, Doha. Petraeus gave no details of the Iranian assistance, which he described as taking place at “a small level.”      Full news...

  • February 13, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Five Afghan Children One Woman Killed in Australian Raid in Uruzgan
    Reuters: Afghanistan condemned on Friday the killing of civilians in a raid by Australian soldiers in the south of the country which it says was not coordinated with Afghan forces. The Australian Defence Force said five children had been killed in a shootout between Taliban insurgents and Australian Special Forces in southern Uruzgan province on Thursday, where they were "clearing" a number of compounds.      Full news...

  • February 7, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    US forces kill school principal in Khost
    PAN: US forces in southeastern Khost province killed a principal of a middle school and injured his wife and a child, an official said Saturday. He said that the school principal Qabol Khan was traveling along with his wife and a child when came under fire by the US forces. Qabol, his wife and the child sustained bullet injuries, he added. The spokesman said that the troops shifted all the injured to Bagram Air Base for treatment, but Qabol died of his wounds.      Full news...

  • February 4, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    UK officer held for Afghan 'casualties leak'
    CNN: A British army officer has been arrested in Afghanistan for allegedly supplying sensitive civilian casualty figures to a human rights campaigner, a British newspaper reported Wednesday. The Ministry of Defence confirmed that an officer was being returned to Britain for questioning on suspicion of leaking state secrets. The figures are controversial, The Sun reported, because critics question official estimates. The paper added that the U.S. military was angry over the reported leak.      Full news...


  • January 28, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghanistan cultivates drugs on record vast area under US invasion
    The News: Illicit drugs production, an issue of global concern in Afghanistan, has set a new record of peak escalation in the war on terror period as compared to previous Taliban-led rule over the land-locked country. “Almost a twenty times additional land has been brought under drugs cultivation in seven years of US-led forces’ control and Karazi administration in Afghanistan,” said official sources while handing over the latest statistics on the neighbouring country.      Full news...

  • January 27, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Anger and unrest continue over US raid in Laghman, Afghanistan
    Wikinews: January 15, a United States military strike in the Afghan province of Laghman killed 15 people, according to U.S. officials. The U.S claims only militants were killed, but on Saturday, village elders disputed that claim with the allegation that the casualties were all civilians. However, this version of events was contested when a statement from the Afghani president's office declared that 16 civilians were killed, not 15 militants. That statement also claimed that two women and three children were among the dead.      Full news...

  • January 26, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Obama's Vietnam
    Antiwar.com: A "team of rivals" is how the Obama administration is being portrayed by the head-over-heels media, which started out by likening the new president to Lincoln and may end up comparing him – favorably – to God. Yet I'm not optimistic, for two very good reasons: Dennis Ross, whose appointment as plenipotentiary for Middle Eastern affairs seems to undercut what is likely to be the Mitchell approach, and Richard Holbrooke, whose dual domain of Afghanistan and Pakistan will be the focus of U.S. military action in the coming years. Specifically, more than 14 years – at least, that's what Holbrooke told us in a pre-election piece in Foreign Affairs magazine:...      Full news...

  • January 25, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    From Hospital, Afghans Rebut U.S. Account
    The New York Times: The outrage over civilian deaths swelled again over the weekend. Hundreds of angry villagers demonstrated here in Mehtarlam, the capital of Laghman Province, on Sunday after an American raid on a village in the province on Friday night. The raid killed at least 16 villagers, including 2 women and 3 children, according to a statement from President Hamid Karzai. They agreed that 13 civilians had been killed and 9 wounded when American commandos broke down doors and unleashed dogs without warning on Jan. 7 in the hunt for a known insurgent in Masamut, in Laghman Province in eastern Afghanistan. The residents were so enraged that they threatened to march on the American military base here.      Full news...

  • January 24, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Taliban ‘treated in same field hospital as British soldiers’
    The Times: The BBC said yesterday that it had received a number of complaints from servicemen about the shared wards at Camp Bastion in Helmand province, southern Afghanistan, which was built at a cost of £10 million and opened in February last year. “A lot of people are getting injured out there and the last thing they want to see when they come round is the Taliban on the same ward,” one soldier told the BBC.      Full news...

  • January 24, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    NATO soldier, over dozen civilians killed in Afghanistan (Roundup)
    South Asia News: US-led forces claimed Saturday they killed 15 rebels, including a female fighter, in eastern Afghanistan. However, a provincial lawmaker and local villagers said that 21 Afghan civilians were killed in the operation. Eleven militants were killed in the firefight, while four others were killed in an airstrike, it said, adding that a female fighter was killed 'while maneuvering on coalition forces and was carrying a rocket-propelled grenade.' However, Abdul Rahimzai, head of Laghman's provincial council, said that Friday night's attack killed 21 civilians and wounded several others.      Full news...

  • January 20, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Locals claim US-led coalition killed 25 civilians in Kapisa
    PAN: Locals and tribal elders Tuesday claimed the US-led coalition troops killed 25 civilians including five women; however coalition troops claim eliminating 18 militants during an operation in central Kapisa province. The sweep was conducted in Anzari Village of Tagab district in the central province late Monday night. Bai Jan, a resident of Anzari Village told Pajhwok Afghan News the US-led soldiers blew up five houses of ordinary people at approximately 2:00am.      Full news...

  • January 19, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghanistan: slipping back into chaos
    La Dépêche.fr: Fundamentalism and corruption could lead to the collapse of Afghanistan in the very near future – not to the democratic and peaceful country that the world promised to create seven years ago. In the past 11 months, more than 4,000 people, including civilians, Nato troops and aid workers, have been killed. The Afghan Minister of Defence has 65,000 troops but has said that he needs 500,000 to control Afghanistan.      Full news...

  • January 18, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Drug Trade Remains A Contentious Issue For ISAF, Afghan Government
    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: Even as new figures point to gains in the battle against Afghanistan's drug problem, the issue remains deeply contentious for the government in Kabul and NATO-led forces. No one, however, is willing to assume ultimate responsibility or to say whether Afghanistan has turned a corner. It remains unclear how much of the decline in opium poppies is a result of government action and how much is owed to weather conditions like drought or cold. Afghan officials tend to emphasize the constraints under which they operate. The country's counternarcotics minister, Colonel General Khodaidad, complains that the drug trade is an "international problem" fueled by Western demand and that the Afghan government has insufficient resources at its disposal.      Full news...

  • January 18, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Nato chief faults Afghan leaders
    BBC News: Nato's secretary general has said corrupt and inefficient government in Afghanistan is as much to blame as insurgents for the chronic instability. In the Washington Post newspaper, Jaap de Hoop Scheffer said the international community had paid enough, in blood and money, to demand government action. He said Afghans needed a government that deserved their loyalty and trust.      Full news...

  • January 16, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghanistan: Fundamental injustice
    The Journal: After NATO's invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, most people thought the world had finally remembered and rescued a country drowned in pain and sorrow. But despite the attention paid by the international community, today Afghanistan is one of the poorest, most under-developed countries in the world. RAWA believes that no other nation can liberate Afghan women, and it is their own responsibility to raise and fight for their rights. In this hard fight we need the support and solidarity of peace-loving and democratic-minded people of the world.      Full news...

  • January 15, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    HRW: US Investigation of Airstrike Deaths in Azizabad ‘Deeply Flawed’
    Human Rights Watch: On October 1, 2008, the Department of Defense published a summary of a report by Brig. Gen. Michael Callan of its investigations into USairstrikes on the village of Azizabad in Herat province on August 21-22, 2008. Since that time, Human Rights Watch has conducted additional research into theevents surrounding the Azizabad airstrikes, reviewed the facts presented in the summary, and analyzed the Callan investigation’s methodology. “The weaknesses in the Callan investigation call into question the Defense Department’s commitment to avoid civiliancasualties,” said Brad Adams, Asia director at Human Rights Watch.      Full news...

  • January 8, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Killing of 17 Afghan Civilians in US-led operation
    The Earth Times: Afghan President Hamid Karzai on Thursday condemned the reported killing of 17 civilians, including women and children, in a US-led coalition operation in eastern Afghanistan, the presidential palace said in a statement. Several demonstration have been staged in Afghan cities and rural areas to condemn the killing of civilians by foreign forces. Unable to seek revenge independently, many Afghan men in southern and eastern Afghanistan have joined the Taliban ranks after losing members of their families in international military operations, according to Afghan officials.      Full news...

  • January 8, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Obama Must Get Afghanistan Right
    The Nation: President-elect Barack Obama not only had the good judgment to oppose the war in Iraq, he argued for the need "to end the mindset that took us into" that war. So it's troubling that he ramped up his rhetoric during the campaign about exiting Iraq in order to focus on what he calls the "central front in the war on terror"--Afghanistan. His plan now calls for an escalation of 20,000 to 30,000 additional American troops over the next year--nearly doubling the current 32,000. New York Times columnist Tom Friedman criticized the Dems' position on Afghanistan as ill-conceived "bumper sticker politics."      Full news...

  • January 7, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    AFGHANISTAN: Losing the battle for Afghan hearts and minds
    Sunday Herald: But just 30 miles from Kabul, it is Taliban country. Over the past year, the militants have established a stronghold in Wardak, which borders the capital to the south and west. As it reasserts control over large swathes of countryside, the Taliban has been installing a shadow government to answer civilian needs. In the absence of effective local governance, the militants have been arresting criminals, providing courts, dispensing justice, running prisons and organising public executions - all within an hour's drive of Kabul.      Full news...

  • January 6, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Helmandis fret over indiscriminate NATO-led ISAF strikes
    PAN: Locals of Sangin district of southern Helmand province Tuesday warned that majority of the residents were compelled to flee the area due to the airstrikes carried out by NATO-led ISAF forces without even informing the local security forces. Locals claimed that over 17 civilians most of them elders and children had been killed by ISAF soldiers during the last fortnight. The locals also criticized the irresponsible strikes of ISAF soldiers in a gathering participated by governor.      Full news...

  • January 6, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Uruzgan clash between insurgents and ISAF causes heavy casualties to civilians
    PAN: Heavy casualties have been reported to locals in clashes between insurgents and ISAF soldiers in central insecure Uruzgan province.... Bari Dad who had barely transferred his injured kins in midnight dark to a hospital in central Uruzgan told this News Agency that due to heavy fighting people were unable to take their injured family members on time to health centers.      Full news...

  • January 3, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    “Talibanization” grows near capital
    Associated Press: Two months ago, Mohammad Anwar recalls, the Taliban paraded accused thieves through his village, tarred their faces with oil and threw them in jail. The public punishment was a clear sign to villagers that the Taliban are now in charge. And the province they took over lies just 30 miles from the Afghan capital of Kabul, right on the main highway. The Taliban has long operated its own shadow government in the most dangerous parts of Afghanistan, but its power is now spreading north to the doorstep of Kabul, according to Associated Press interviews with a dozen government officials, analysts, Taliban commanders and Afghan villagers.      Full news...

  • January 2, 2009 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghanistan an ill-conceived blunder
    Midland Free Press: What will it take to convince the Harper government that Canada's military invasion of Afghanistan was an ill-conceived, monumental blunder and failure? As of Dec. 28, 2008 the lives of 106 Canadian soldiers in the flourishing stage of their youthful development have been killed in a war started by George W. Bush and his hawkish Republican Administration. The loss of one Canadian in Bush's war, or what could become Obama's war, is one too many. Further in this regard, Barack Obama's ostentatious saber rattling during his election campaign and his more recent pronouncements on the subject, is not an auspicious or favourable beginning for a newly-elected president of the USA.      Full news...

  • December 30, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Corruption destroying Afghanistan’s ‘democracy’
    Galesburg.com: Chayes, who organized a co-op of Afghan men and women making skin care products from herbs and botanicals as an alternative to the opium poppy trade, wrote, “I hear from Westerners that corruption is intrinsic to Afghan culture, that we should not hold Afghans up to our standards. I hear that Afghanistan is a tribal place, that it has never been, and can’t be, governed. But that’s not what I hear from Afghans.” What they see instead, she said, is a restoration to power under President Hamid Karzai of the gunslinging, crooked warlords who were repudiated when the Taliban first started taking over vast parts of the country a few years after the Soviet withdrawal in 1989. The “appalling behavior” of officials in the current government, including rampant bribery, extortion and violence, is a serious factor in the Taliban resurgence.      Full news...

  • December 17, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Coalition forces kill three of an Afghan family in Khost
    PAN: Three of a family, including a couple and their son were killed by the firing of Coalition forces in Kandao area near NATO base in Khost City of the eastern Khost province. Tahir Khan Sabri, deputy governor of the province told Pajhwok Afghan News that coalition forces in an operation at the house of the brother of Dr. Bilal has killed his brother, sister-in-law and nephew.      Full news...

  • December 17, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    The failure to end corruption threatens Afghanistan’s future
    The Washington Post: Nurallah strode into our workshop in Khandahar shaking with rage. His mood shattered ours. "This is no government," he stormed. "The police are like animals." In the seven years I've lived in this stronghold of the Afghan south - the erstwhile capital of the Taliban and the focus of their renewed assault on the country - most of my conversations with locals about what's going wrong have centered on corruption and abuse of power. "More than roads, more than schools or wells or electricity, we need good governance," said Nurallah during yet another discussion a couple of weeks ago.      Full news...

  • December 16, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    From the CIA to the ISI to the Lashkar-e-Taiba: Mumbai Terror’s Afghan Roots
    CounterPunch.org: After early speculation that the recent Mumbai attacks were linked to Pakistan, a former U.S. Defense Department official now asserts that Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) had a hand in training the Lashkar-e-Taiba terrorists. Earlier this year Afghan president Hamid Karzai blamed Pakistan for a brazen assassination attempt from which he barely escaped, and U.S. officials contend that the July 7, 2008 bombing of India’s Kabul Embassy, which claimed 41 lives, had also been aided by the ISI.      Full news...

  • December 16, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Meet the Taliban Commander Who Likes Girls And Shopping
    The First Post: Qadir, a short plump man constantly on the phone making social arrangements, did not join the Taliban for ideological reasons. He was in Kabul on an infrequent shopping trip, ahead of the Muslim festival of Eid. With deep black hair, beard and eyes, Qadir is Pashtun - the ethnic group from which the Taliban draws most of its support - and he sprawled low in the back of the taxi until we were able to stop and find a private room with draped windows where he propped himself up on a pile of cushions and smoked ferociously while we talked. "To begin with I thought the international forces would bring peace and stability," Qadir said. "Then they started treating Afghans as their enemies. Their Apache helicopters killed civilians working in the fields."      Full news...

  • December 15, 2008 :: RSS :: Print :: Email
    Afghan reporters keep shoes on for Bush, ordered to call him “His Excellency”
    The Associated Press: A day after an Iraqi reporter hurled a pair of shoes at President George W. Bush, the American leader on Monday again held a news conference before a group of reporters from a country that the U.S. invaded under his watch. Karzai's deputy spokesman, Saimak Herwai, told Afghan reporters that they had to address Bush as "His Excellency," an honorary title not typically used with U.S. presidents.      Full news...



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