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Devdiscourse, June 17, 2023

Systematic discrimination against women in Afghanistan, UN report highlights

"One of the most illustrative examples of the systematic discrimination against women and girls in Afghanistan today is the relentless issuance of edicts, decrees, declarations and directives restricting their rights, including their freedom of movement, attire and behaviour, and their access to education, work, health and justice,"

systematic_discrimination_against_women_in_afghanistan

"One of the most illustrative examples of the systematic discrimination against women and girls in Afghanistan today is the relentless issuance of edicts, decrees, declarations and directives restricting their rights, including their freedom of movement, attire and behaviour, and their access to education, work, health and justice," the United Nations special rapporteur for Afghanistan Richard Bennett's report read.

united Nations special rapporteur for Afghanistan Richard Bennett's report highlighted the discrimination against women and girls and said that there is a "systematic discrimination to which women and girls in Afghanistan are subjected," TOLONews reported. According to the report, between September 2021 and May 2023 over 50 edicts were issued regarding women and girls by the Islamic Emirate, which has "deprived Afghan women of the right to education, work, and participation in social and political life."

"One of the most illustrative examples of the systematic discrimination against women and girls in Afghanistan today is the relentless issuance of edicts, decrees, declarations and directives restricting their rights, including their freedom of movement, attire and behaviour, and their access to education, work, health and justice," the report read. Among the topics covered in this report are the issue of education, suicides, depression, forced marriages, and the sale of children in Afghanistan, according to TOLONews."In their totality, the edicts significantly limit women's and girls' ability to engage in society, have access to basic services and earn a living," the report further stated. "We need women who are doctors, engineers, lawyers, and advocates for the rights of each and every person in this society," said Alamtab RAsouli, a women's rights activist.

According to the report, a number of protesting women were released from the Islamic Emirate prisons under the condition of stopping the street protests. However, the Islamic Emirate called this report unfair and baseless and added that the Islamic and cultural values of Afghanistan have been ignored in this report.

The Special Rapporteur and the Working Group interviewed a total of 79 Afghans (67 women and 12 men), of whom 63 (51 women and 12 men) were inside Afghanistan. They included human rights defenders, journalists, lawyers, academics, entrepreneurs, teachers, students, social service providers and businesswomen. In addition, they conducted a survey of 2,112 Afghan women across 18 provinces in March 2023 and drew on the insights of a further 159 women focus group participants on the survey results in 11 provinces, as per TOLONews. Afghanistan's women have faced numerous challenges since the Taliban returned to power in 2021. Girls and women in the war-torn country have no access to education, employment and public spaces.

Taliban has imposed draconian restrictions on the rights to freedom of expression, association, assembly, and movement for women and girls. (ANI)

Category: Taliban/ISIS/Terrorism, Women, Taliban Restrictions - Views: 1951



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