News from the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA)
RAWA News


 

 

 

Add RAWA RSS Feed to Feedreaders



 




 


RAWA Photo Gallery
From RAWA Photo Gallery
 


Help RAWA: Order from our wish list on Amazon.com

RAWA Channel on Youtube

Follow RAWA on Twitter

Join RAWA on Facebook


FirstNews, February 1, 2014

Afghan hunger crisis: “One of world’s hardest places to grow up,” says charity

THERE are health fears for young people in Afghanistan – the country’s next generation – as many struggle to find food

By Callum Jones

Across the country over the past few weeks, children have been seen waiting for hours at donation points.

Research by the United Nations global peace organisation suggests that 55% – more than half – of children in Afghanistan are failing to grow or develop properly. Experts say that this is because young people in the country are often not given enough food in the first two years of their lives.

Research by the United Nations global peace organisation suggests that 55% – more than half – of children in Afghanistan are failing to grow or develop properly. Experts say that this is because young people in the country are often not given enough food in the first two years of their lives.
“Afghanistan is one of the hardest places in the world to be born and grow up, with one in ten children dying before the age of five,” Charles Davy of the Afghanaid charity told First News.
FirstNews, Feb. 1, 2014

“Afghanistan is one of the hardest places in the world to be born and grow up, with one in ten children dying before the age of five,” Charles Davy of the Afghanaid charity told First News.

The World Food Programme’s Carrie Morrison told The Guardian the crisis could have a “very damaging effect” on the country. “Young people are not able to attain what they should be able to attain,” she explained.

For 13 years, UK forces have been fighting a war in Afghanistan against the Taliban militant group. They are set to leave the country by the end of 2014. With the Taliban expected to retake control of parts of the country, and many struggling to find food, some critics have asked what Britain has achieved in Afghanistan.

The UK Government gives Afghan leaders £178 million each year to help sort the country’s poverty problems. Afghanaid’s Charles Davy said: “It is critical that when British and other international troops withdraw from Afghanistan, the international community as a whole remains committed.”

Category: Children, Poverty - Views: 5670